Resources

The main resources the SCGA provides.

Damage Prevention Professional
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The Damage Prevention Professional Magazine is published quarterly. Each quarter has a theme related to underground infrastructure protection and safety. Each issue is filled with news articles, technology reports and feature articles written by Industry Professionals. 

SCGA Best Practices
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 The SCGA's current version of Best Practices (version 1) was adapted a few years ago by a SGCA Committee and was built largely on similar work by other Regional partners. A primary objective of the SCGA is to build from this preliminary work and complete a second version in 2013. This work will consider concerns of local stakeholders across all key sectors and will also integrate, and harmonize with a similar effort that is occurring concurrently at the national level.


Damage Information Reporting Tool (DIRT)
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How many damages occur each year?
What are the primary causes of damages and near misses?
Are these events increasing or decreasing – and why?
Are some educational campaigns more effective than others?


These are some of the many difficult questions that remain unanswered due to the lack of data on a national level. Being able to answer these questions remains a necessary step in ensuring the safety and protection of people and underground infrastructure. To begin to address some of these questions, CGA's stakeholders have focused on developing a method for national data collection. The result is DIRT (www.cga-dirt.com) - a secure web application for the collection and reporting of underground damage information.

DIRT allows users to submit damage and near miss reports; browse files submitted by the user’s organization; administer role-based company and user information; edit personal profiles; change/retrieve password; and submit feedback and questions. Anyone involved in underground facilities can contribute to and generate information from the DIRT tool. You simply have to go through the registration process to participate.

  • Provides answers through data analysis

  • Assists Best Practice Committees in their efforts

  • Supports industry stakeholders

  • Enhances Public Safety


Purpose of Data Collection


The primary purpose in collecting underground facility damage data is to analyze data, to learn why events occur, and how actions by industry can prevent them in the future; thereby, ensuring the safety and protection of people and the infrastructure. Data collection will allow the CGA to identify root causes, perform trend analysis, and help educate all stakeholders so that damages can be reduced through effective practices and procedures.

The CGA's purpose is to reduce underground facility damage, which threatens the public's safety and costs millions of dollars each year. In order to better understand where, how and why these damages are occurring, we require accurate and comprehensive data from all stakeholders. The data will be analyzed and our findings will be issued via comprehensive reports. The data will NOT be used for enforcement purposes or to try and determine damage liability. The individual identities of parties involved with records submitted will be kept confidential.

Recent Analysis of Dirt

While the SCGA is just gathering and preparing its data collected in this regards the CGA in the United States has been analyzing its data for a number of years. While there may be some slight differences in Saskatchewan, the CGA report provides some of the desired analysis and assessment of root cause of incidents in its reporting areas. The 2012 CGA DIRT Report is available in the Publications section.

Getting Started


To participate in DIRT, simply go to www.cga-dirt.com and register as a user. Once your registration is confirmed, you can begin submitting damage information or generate reports on the existing data.

Know What You Are Digging On - Utility Colour Codes

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Utility colour codes are used for identifying existing underground utilities in construction areas with the intent of protecting them from damage during excavation. Coloured lines, flags or stakes are used to mark the location and denote the type of underground utility. The following table identifies the Uniform Colour Codes for temporary marking of underground utilities. 

Red

electric power lines, cables, conduit, and lighting cables

Orange

telecommunication, alarm or signal lines, cables, or conduit

Yellow

natural gas, oil, steam, petroleum, or other gaseous or flammable material

Green

sewers and drain lines

Blue

potable drinking water

Violet

reclaimed water, irrigation, and slurry lines

Pink

temporary survey markings, unknown/unidentified facilities

White

proposed excavation limits or route

Publications & Videos

The SCGA offers to its members Publications and Video information from external sources that can assist members in their Damage Prevention efforts and keep them current with events of interest.

Socio-Economic Cost Assessment Regarding Damages to Underground Infrastructures

The Quebec Common Ground Alliance (APISQ) has received a report completed by Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal identifying indirect costs of at least $75 million per year resulting from excavation incidents with underground infrastructure in Quebec in 2012.
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Move Energy Safely

(Standing Senate Committee on Energy, the Environment and Natural Resources -- August 2013)

This report recommends that the federal government facilitate efforts to establish a national access point for information on the location of buried infrastructure, as well as the promotion of one-call centres and call-before-you-dig initiatives. Information on the coordinates of underground infrastructure should be consulted prior to any excavation activities by a third party.
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2012 CGA DIRT Report

The Damage Information Reporting Tool (DIRT) is the result of the efforts of the Common Ground Alliance (CGA). Data is gathered for 2012 regarding the occurrence of underground facility events. An event is defined as “the occurrence of downtime, damages, and near misses.” DIRT provides industry stakeholders with a way to anonymously submit data into a comprehensive database for analysis of the factors that lead to events.
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CSA S250 Mapping of Underground Utilities

This attachment introduces CSA S250 Mapping of Underground Utility Infrastructure which is derived from mapping best practices and internal utility company mapping standards. It encourages a management systems approach to mapping and record keeping.
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2011 CGA DIRT Report

The Damage Information Reporting Tool (DIRT) is the result of the efforts of the Common Ground Alliance (CGA). Data is gathered for 2011 regarding the occurrence of underground facility events. An event is defined as “the occurrence of downtime, damages, and near misses.” DIRT provides industry stakeholders with a way to anonymously submit data into a comprehensive database for analysis of the factors that lead to events.
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CRTC Denies CCGA Application for Shared Use of 811

CRTC Denies CCGA Application for Shared Use of 811 22 Mar 2012. It is with disappointment that the CCGA, its Regional Partners across Canada and its National Stakeholders The Canadian Energy Pipeline Association and the Canadian Gas Association, announce the CRTC decision to deny the CCGA application for shared use of the 811 dialling code. For a Telecom proceeding, the CCGA application generated an unprecedented level of positive response from coast to coast. With that in mind, the CCGA remains confident there is a strong public desire to simplify access to One Call systems in Canada enhancing the integrity of our buried critical infrastructure and above all, better protecting public, worker and Community Safety. To that end, the CCGA and its partners are reviewing the CRTC's decision and considering next steps.
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CCGA White Paper "Damage Prevention Legislation Elements Required for Canada"

This white paper, developed by the Canadian Common Ground Alliance articulates a series of principles and specific elements for effective legislation that, along with other key elements like improved communication and the development of safe excavation best practices, would result in safer digging practices, greater protection of underground infrastructure, and community safety.

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Field Tile Testimonial (Video)

A farmer shares his first hand experience of encountering a petroleum pipeline while installing field tile.

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TransCanada Dig Safe (Video)

This Call before you Dig video is provided by TransCanada.


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